Scuba To Dover

Scuba diving from the South East corner of the UK has to be the most exciting. History will allude to the battles fought and weather plagued catastrophes that make Dover and the English Channel a must for any utopian wreck diver.

With a plethora of dive sites to choose, you will not be disappointed. However, be aware that “Chasing the Viz” maybe the order of the day as weather and tidal flow can be inclement, dictating a different dive site to that previously advertised. The typical rule of diving with Mutiny is that you descend and ascend the shot, lining out and reeling in. Visibility can be limited and loss of light can make adventures dark, but you will be rewarded with some fantastic historic diving and you never know, a little treasure maybe found too.

This year there are three dedicated U-Boat diving weekends, which are selling out fast.

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Full 10%
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Full 100%
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Full 60%

Scuba To Ramsgate

Lying in the middle of the English channel in the narrow Straits of Dover, close to one of the busiest shipping channel in the world, the sands present a great challenge to navigators. Since the first documented shipwreck on Goodwin Sands in 1298, more than 2,000 ships are believed to have wrecked here.

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Full 20%

The ocean liner MV Dunbar Castle [+1940] (Capt. H. A. Causton) was on a voyage from London to Beira with a crew of 150 and 48 passengers in convoy. On 9th January 1940, she struck a mine two miles N/E of the North Gopdwins and foundered in 30 minutes. Photo of the twin-screw passenger motor vessel MV Dunbar Castle sunken up to the boat deck on Goodwin Sands in 1940.

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Full 60%

The SS Mahratta [+1939] ran aground and was wrecked on the Goodwin Sands on the 6th October 1939 when on route from Calcutta for London with a General Cargo. She was the second and final Brocklebank Line ship with this name. The first Mahratta suffered a similar fate in 1909.